2004 Automatic Rear Door latch

New Topics Forums General Discussion 2004 – 2009 Nissan Quest 2004 Automatic Rear Door latch

This topic contains 9 replies, has 5 voices, and was last updated by  xtlicious 1 year ago.

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  • #6669

    dannyman711
    Participant

    Hi has anyone ever had any problems with the rear door not working at all. Im currently having to manually pull the latch inside to get in the trunk. Just a day ago I could hear the motor or something working… but it was hit and miss. What part is this I should be looking for if anyone has any ideas please. Email me at dannyman711@gmail.com or write me here…. thank you so much

    #6709

    bgrubb7
    Participant

    I am also having similar problems with my ’04 rear hatch. Sometimes it works. Sometimes it won’t. Sometimes you can get it to work by pressing the on/off switch on the overhead console Off, then back on. This seems to “reset” it. Other times, this trick doesn’t work. Sometimes it works from the overhead button, but not the key fob. Other times, it may be the other way around. Sometimes the hatch will close on command, but it won’t pull fully latched. When this happens, it almost always becomes “disabled” until you manually open, then shut it, then toggle the on/off switch… These problems are very inconsistent, which makes things difficult to diagnose.

    Surely someone here has some experience in troubleshooting this similar issue…

    Thanks!!

    #6710

    Oldman
    Participant

    When that happens its usually a weak motor. I have not taken it apart but according to the FSM (bl.pdf)
    it’s part of the back door control unit below the driver’s side back window.

    #6712

    bgrubb7
    Participant

    Mine will not even open with the Back Door handle in manual mode (when the main on/off button on overhead console is turned OFF). So I don’t think the Motor assembly has anything to do with it. Even in manual mode, sometimes it works, sometimes it doesn’t. I have been reading through the FSM, and attempting to diagnose, but can’t get very far. I tried using the diagnostic mode, but can’t get it to go in diagnostic mode. Been reading through the FSM for hours and it’s just turning my poor brain to mush…

    Since the back door handle is not a manual handle at all, but just a switch, I’m thinking that the entire system is not getting power most of the time. Whatever is causing the problem, it is in both Automatic and Manual mode. Does the Body Control Module supply the power to both the Motor/Control Unit AND the rear handle/latch in BOTH Automatic AND Manual mode?

    At this point I’m leaning toward the BCM being the culprit, which will require a trip to the dealer…

    • This reply was modified 2 years, 9 months ago by  bgrubb7.
    #6714

    Oldman
    Participant

    According to BL-36 the BCM terminal 58 supplies power to the back door latch actuator (no. 13 on page 173) so yes the BCM is a factor, but may not be the culprit. You should diagnose the electric latches first.

    Have another look at BL-173 and 174. If or when you can manage to unlatch it and keep it open try to access the motor and unplug it first so it wont try to close the door when the button is pushed the second time. With the motor out of the way you can test for power going to the latches (the ones in right side box on p. 173). Test for power on the latches with someone else being the button pusher. You should get power on all those latch harnesses. If not you should check terminal 58 of the BCM (orange wire). If that works there’s a break somewhere between the BCM and the wires going to the latches. If that’s not the problem check the mechanical movements of the latches before you condemn the BCM. BL-39 and 40 talk about checking the bcm power supply. Pay attention to no. 2 and 3.

    #6715

    bgrubb7
    Participant

    I finally got some time to work on this…

    Not for sure what you mean my unplugging the motor and then testing power to the latches. It appears that all power goes through the harness to the motor (and Control Unit). With the motor unplugged, I couldn’t find any power to the rear latch. Anyways… moot point…

    I did take a closer look at the rear latch/clincher assembly as you suggested and I now believe that was the culprit. The first thing I noticed is that when left the hatch open… (With automatic system switched to OFF) I could manually close the latching mechanism with a screwdriver and it would clinch shut and open with the rear door handle every time. Then I crawled into the rear of the van so I could open and actually pull close the rear hatch from the inside. With the rear panel off, you can easily press on the actual limit switch on backside of the rear handle to open.

    What I found was that when I physically closed the rear hatch (as opposed to closing the latching mechanism with a screwdriver), that the failure is back. The door would open sometimes, then eventually fail to open from the rear handle command. Also the clinching action would periodically fail and this would always be followed by a failure to release when the rear handle was activated. I did notice that the rear latch didn’t seem to align perfectly with the striker, so with a little adjustment and careful dead blow hammering of the striker, I got them lined up perfectly. This helped, but did not eliminate the failure.

    Second thing I noticed, was that during a failed attempt to open, when I activated the rear handle switch, I could hear a click from the control unit on the motor assembly. This suggested to me that the relay in the motor assembly was doing it’s job, sending power to the rear latch, but the latch wasn’t obeying the command. The open command would continue to fail (you get the warning or error beeps) and would not work again until manually opened with the manual lever and hatch re-closed.

    Third, I noticed that after a failure to release, there would be no sound or movement from the motor on the latch assembly. I could tap on the latch motor with a screwdriver (much like you would on a sticky starter solenoid) and it would work on the next open command. So I’m thinking the motor itself is sticking or there is a bad connection in the motor with a brush or something like that.

    I took the latch assembly off, and removed the latch motor. There was quite a bit of carbon dust buildup from the brushes. I cleaned it out with some WD-40 and a toothbrush, cleaned the carbon buildup on commutator and re-lubed the spindle ends with some white grease. Reassembled and reinstalled the latch assembly.

    So far (fingers crossed/knock on wood) it seems to have done the trick. I opened and closed (Auto mode = OFF) dozens of times with no fail, and since then have been opening and closing in auto mode with no fails at all for that last couple days.

    I’ll update if the situation changes… Thanks!!

    • This reply was modified 2 years, 9 months ago by  bgrubb7.
    #6717

    Oldman
    Participant

    Very good that you fixed it yourself. How much would the dealer have charged? I believe hundreds of dollars.

    #10661

    xtlicious
    Participant

    I’m partially reviving this thread to add some detail to the above fix. I’m currently in the process of troubleshooting the exact same problem with my 2005 Quest with 177k miles.

    I found that the driver’s side rear sunroof panel was leaking slightly for a long time (visible rust around the interior edge), just a drip at a time, and running down the non-visible backside of the headliner, behind and down the plastic interior trim panels, and right into the door motor and door lift transmission. This has caused the pieces to rust slightly and bind. Removing, cleaning, and re-greasing the door transmission has helped it come back to life, in combination with…

    Removing the door latch motor and transmission, and also R&R-ing it with new grease. Note that I didn’t disassemble either the latch assembly or the door lift motor and transmission, but rather simply cleaned what I could see. This helped the intermittent door handle operation (just as described above), in combination with…

    Replacing the rear hatch lift struts with generic bits from an online retailer. Part # 901779, $16.30 each before shipping and tax.

    The hardest part of the above repairs was taking off plastic interior pieces. I did not remove the headliner fully to repair the leaking sunroof panel; instead I used clear waterproof caulk around the outside of the panel and the roof to fix that problem. (If you go this route be sure to thoroughly clean and de-grease the bonding surfaces.)

    I’m probably one of the few folks who is happy with his purchase, having paid only $3500 for the van earlier in 2015. It needed a lot, but after replacing the usual suspects (engine mounts, CV axles, adjust driver’s door lock actuator arm, valve cover gaskets, and tire rotation/balance) it’s been a roomy, unique van.

    #10671

    Canada-Q2005
    Participant

    All the root causes of failures described above do sound to me like the intentionally designed flaws to limit lifetime of the vehicle and cause maximum amount of failures after warranty expires. In other words Nissan is no longer a Japanese company (whose value used to be honor for quality) but a domestic cash-grabbing-and-running outfit.

    #10681

    xtlicious
    Participant

    I understand your feelings toward them are severe, but there’s no reason to jump to such a conclusion. It’s well-known that the Quest, specifically, has quality control issues. Instead, let’s focus on homegrown solutions to prove that we can fix what is broken! No car company is perfect, nor is any person perfect.

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