Cabin Lights Short 2000 Quest

New Topics Forums General Discussion 1999 – 2002 Nissan Quest Cabin Lights Short 2000 Quest

This topic contains 11 replies, has 2 voices, and was last updated by  Hoseman1958 2 months, 3 weeks ago.

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  • #12791

    Hoseman1958
    Participant

    Started to notice that the “open door” dash warning would come on when I made a banked right turn. Cabin lights flash on when this happens. It has gotten worse and is very disconcerting when driving at night. I have removed the cabin lights fuse for now. Any suggestions out there on how to fix this?

    #12811

    prgonzalez
    Participant

    Hoseman,

    1. Do you have the service manuals of the van? If not, please download them from http://www.nicoclub.com. Follow the right tab “Service Manuals”

    2. Once you have the PDF manuals, look at the EL (electrical) fle. Go to the INTERIOR ROOM LAMP section. Take the time to understand the schematics or electrical diagrams. All lights are controlled by one SMART ENTRANCE CONTROL UNIT (SECU).

    3. IMHO, your problem could be in the following order: a) one door switch, b) Smart Entrance Control Unit (SECU).

    I have looked at the schematics and I do not see any relation between the steering wheel position and the SECU.

    Please check every door switch from corrosion, check every door is fully closing.

    Let me know hoe it goes. I will be here to assist you.

    Pedro

    • This reply was modified 3 months, 1 week ago by  prgonzalez.
    #12891

    Hoseman1958
    Participant

    Thank Mr. Pedro,

    I have a circuit tester, but do not yet understand how to use it. What I did do is spray all of the door hinges with penetrating oil and, after a time, re-inserted the cabin lights fuse. The problem seemed to have abated, but after driving the vehicle on a 2 hour trip that involved some steep, banked mountain curves, I can see that the problem is still occurring, and only when I make a sharp, banked right turn. When it started happening, I got out and slammed the doors shut and this seemed to curtail the frequency of the problem, but it is definitely still there. I have the service manual and can see the Electrical Schematics, but am not sure where to touch the leads of the tester in each instance.

    I have a separate short in my right front headlight. It will not come on unless I open the hood and jiggle the wire leading to the connector – and then it only stays on temporarily. I have an almost identical salvage vehicle that I use for parts and know that I have a replacement for the complete wire harness leading to that headlight, but am unsure of where or how to diagnose the short and make the repair/replacement. Thank you in advance for any advice that you might be able to give.

    #13241

    prgonzalez
    Participant

    Hoseman,

    Okay, we have multiple challenges on this van. First, has the van been wrecked at one point? If yes, there is a good chance a part of the wire harness was damaged by metal parts crushing the harness. This will explain erratic behavior when the wires move around. Again, if this is the case, the best solution is to replace the harness. Another solution is to identify and replaced all bad wires only. However, this takes more time.

    In regards to the tester, what kind of tester do you have? Is it a multi-meter? Please let me know brand and model and perhaps I can find if on the internet to give you some tips.

    In the mean time, my suggestion is to start isolating the door switches. For this, remove each door switch and verify their state of corrosion, broken studs, electrical wires, etc.

    For your front headlight, visually inspect the connector and look for signs of overheat, high temperature damage, or burnt connector. If this is the case, you will have to replace the connector and few inches of wire.

    Let me know what you find.

    #15651

    Hoseman1958
    Participant

    2000 Quest Headlight Connectors and Electical Testing Devices

    Mr. Gonzalez,

    Since I do not know how to use either of the circuit testing devices shown in the pictures above, I did a close visual inspection of the headlight connector and the pics above will show that the middle female receptacle is pretty well shot. I have a salvage vehicle with all of the electrical harnesses and parts intact. I included a picture of the replacement connector that I can use (yes, that is mud wasp deposits that you see, but I can clean that.) If all I have to do is cut and splice the three wires, is there any advice you can give on how to do that optimally? I tried to poke the circuit tester shown in the pic though a couple of the wires, but nothing happened. Do the headlights need to be turned on when you use that device? Once I solve this problem, I will move on to the problem with the cabin lights coming on when I make a banked right turn.

    Any advice you might be able to give on how to splice the headlight connector, and how to use the testing devices would be very much appreciated.

    Cheers, Reggie (Hoseman)

    #15661

    Hoseman1958
    Participant

    Headlight Connector
    Headlight Connector
    Headlight Connector
    Headlight Connector
    Electical Testing Devices

    • This reply was modified 2 months, 4 weeks ago by  Hoseman1958. Reason: Picture links from Google Drive weren't working
    #15671

    Hoseman1958
    Participant

    Hope the pics show up here.

    #15691

    prgonzalez
    Participant

    Reggie,

    I was able to see the pictures. The burnt connector explains everything. That is good and this fix will be quick. All you need to do is to cut the damaged connector as close to the connector as you can. Then, peel some of the plastic wire protector in order to expose two to three inches of the three wires. Remove about half-inch of insulation at the tip of each wire. If any copper wire strands look burnt, cut some more until you have clean copper strands in each wire.

    From the new spare connector, remove the mud from the connector and cut the wires about six inches from the connector. You will also be using some of the plastic protector flex tubing to cover these six inches later on. Remove half-inch of insulation in each wire. The copper of each wire should be clean free of any green/white/brown oxidation.

    Get some heat wrap tubing or sleeves at your local Autozone. Select the closest diameter to the wire insulation. The sleeve has to fit loose and not tight to the insulation. Use about 2 inches of heat wrap sleeve for each wire. Insert the sleeves at each wire in the new connector. Place the sleeves at the connector side away from the tip of wire to be spliced. You can also use a bigger diameter heat wrap sleeve to cover all three wires around if you want.

    Now, match color and position of one wire, hardness and connector side. The wires should match in color and strips, red with red, black with black, and yellow with yellow. Please them one in front of the other with about 1/4 inch of copper passing the insulation of the wire in front, twist the wires together until they are secured, and solder the union. Do not apply too much tin. The trick is to prevent sharp or pointing tin spots in the union to prevent pinching the insulating sleeve or heat wrap. Once the wire is soldered, place the heat wrap sleeve in the union so the union is in the middle section of the sleeve. Now apply heat to the sleeve using a heat gun or rubbing the tip of the soldering iron in rapid back and forth movement until the sleeve is tight in the wire. Repeat this process with the other two wires. If you have a larger sleeve, then use it to cover all three unions. This sleeve would be 3 inches long. Finally, protect all exposed wires with the black plastic flex tubing and seal with electrical tape.

    I hope I explained myself correctly in the procedure above.

    Finally, you need to find out why the connector was damaged. Make sure the headlight bulb is the correct power. A larger power bulb will overheat the cable and connector. Make sure there are no short circuits or other wires when connecting the headlight again.

    Let me know how it goes. I will post tester information later.

    Pedro

    #15701

    Hoseman1958
    Participant

    Pedro,

    This is very clear. My confidence in my soldering skills is somewhat lacking. If I use the heat shrink sleeves on each twisted wire and electrical tape the union together before protecting with the black flex tubing, will that suffice? I tried to solder the bridge connector on the old resistor for the heater blower motor and ended up with a big blob of tin. Thank you again for your precise reply.

    Cheers,
    Reggie

    #15711

    Hoseman1958
    Participant

    OK, I got this done and the headlight is working perfectly now. My attempt at doing the soldering was ugly, and I could not slide the heat shrink sleeves back over the twisted pairs. I used electrical tape around each pair, then bundled the 3 pairs with more electrical tape before taping the flex tubing around the bundle.

    It needs to be noted that about a year ago, I noticed that this headlight had a good quantity of water in it. I drilled a small hole in the bottom of the lens to drain the water out, but even today, there is still condensation inside. I have two replacement headlamp assemblies for this vehicle, but even after looking at the manual, am confused about how to put change them out. Also, every time I mess with the black retainer rings that hold the bulb and connector in the socket, I break a piece of plastic off of the ring. If anyone knows of where I could buy these retainer rings I would be grateful to hear about it. Also, if there is any quick advice about changing out the headlight assemblies, I would be grateful to hear that too. Pedro, thank you again. Your precise instructions were perfect for a sometimes reluctant do-it-yourselfer like me.

    Cheers, Reggie

    #15721

    prgonzalez
    Participant

    Reggie,

    I am glad you have two good working headlights now.

    Water in the headlights is caused by either broken glass or bad seal. To replace them, you have to remove the side marker light. Open the hood, there is a Phillips screw holding the side marker. You will see a small light-gray lip coming out of top of the marker. Remove the screw and pry the marker out to the side of the car. Once the markers are removed, you will see two 10-mm head screw that hold the headlight on the side; there is another 10-mm nut holding the headlight on the back; and there is another 10-mm head screw holding the headlight on top. That will remove the headlight. There is no need to remove any parts of the front bumper cover like other cars.

    If the front surface of your headlights are too damaged and not clear at all, you can consider buying new cheap aftermarket headlights. You can find them as low as US$100 each.

    For the black retainers, they are Nissan 26029-7B000. You can find them in eBay or internet, perhaps AZ has them too.

    Many years ago, I bought a new pair of headlights and retrofit them with HID bi-xenon 2.5″ FX-R projectors. The whole retrofit cost me around US$600. I did the installation myself but it requires some skill with the dremel. However, the final result was outstanding modern HID projectors exactly as you see in any infinity today.

    Pedro

    #15981

    Hoseman1958
    Participant

    Pedro,

    Your descriptions are really well written and give me confidence that I can do what is necessary. When I get around to replacing the headlamps, you are going to get a good laugh out of one of the pictures that I send.

    I hit a small deer about a year ago with a glancing blow off of the drivers side marking light. The deer got up immediately and ran, apparently unharmed, into the woods. When I got out to check the vehicle though, the side marker light was hanging by the connector. The fastener holes in the bezel were snapped off, so I duct taped it until I got home and used a bike cable with one of the knob ends still on it to sort of “sew” the side marking light onto the frame. When I do the headlamp replacement, I’m going to need to remove my “creation” and am wondering if you might have any better ideas about how to re-attach that marking light considering the damage to the bezel. The plastic pieces on this vehicle are so brittle and I break parts off all the time. Thank you for the part number on the black retainers. I’ll be looking for them.

    Best regards, Reggie

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