Power Sliding Door — Broken Cable Repair

New Topics Forums General Discussion 2004 – 2009 Nissan Quest Power Sliding Door — Broken Cable Repair

This topic contains 20 replies, has 5 voices, and was last updated by  Canada-Q2005 2 years, 1 month ago.

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 21 total)
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  • #6554

    Jimmy Newtron
    Participant

    Hi everyone,

    Like many of you, one of the cables on our power sliding door recently broke. I quickly found out 3 things that pissed me off to no end:
    1) that while there is a TSB for this issue in the US (which Nissan will fix at no-charge), in Canada we once a gain get screwed and there is no goodwill to be had.
    2) the dealer parts you need to buy to fix this problem are stupid expensive ($480 for the cable mechanism alone + motor if needed + labour).
    3) the part I really need (the cable) is not sold separately.

    So cobbling info gleamed from others with this issue, I thought I would publish the definitive step-by-step repair guide for those of you who want a cheap fix. This is “Part 1” of my attempt to simply change the cable.

    As soon as I complete the repair (assuming I can make my own replacement cable), I’ll publish “Part 2”

    Enjoy!
    Jim

    #6555

    Jimmy Newtron
    Participant

    • This reply was modified 4 years, 3 months ago by  Jimmy Newtron.
    #6557

    Jimmy Newtron
    Participant

    Part 1: Disassembly

    Remove taillight to gain access to sliding door track cover set screw

    Remove the screw holding on the cover as indicated

    Gently pop off the cover pulling from rear of van towards the front

    • This reply was modified 4 years, 3 months ago by  Jimmy Newtron.
    • This reply was modified 4 years, 3 months ago by  Jimmy Newtron.
    • This reply was modified 4 years, 3 months ago by  Jimmy Newtron.
    #6561

    Jimmy Newtron
    Participant

    Tail Light Removal

    • This reply was modified 4 years, 3 months ago by  Jimmy Newtron.
    #6563

    Jimmy Newtron
    Participant

    Remove Tail Light

    Remove track cover screw

    Remove track

    • This reply was modified 4 years, 3 months ago by  Jimmy Newtron.
    #6565

    Jimmy Newtron
    Participant

    Close up of where the cable is attached to the door. Notice that there is no easy way to remove the cable from the door. It appears that if you could rotate the cable 90 degrees so it’s perpendicular to the door, you can pop the cable/nipple out by pushing it downward. I found it easier to remove the 6 screws holding the track on and simply slide the door off the track (you’ll need help to hold the door up) and remove the cable without fighting the tight quarters

    #6566

    Jimmy Newtron
    Participant

    To remove the inside panels, you need to remove the “bag hooks” as shown:

    Then gently pull the side panel away from the frame. Note, I did no find it necessary to completely remove the panel and left it attached at the rear edge by the rear door


    #6567

    Jimmy Newtron
    Participant

    Once the panel is pulled back, simply remove the broken parts




    #6568

    Jimmy Newtron
    Participant

    Cable wise, the size is coated (vinyl) 1/16″ with a lead nipple similar in size to that found on a bicycle. Mine failed at the joint (see image) do to corrosion likely caused by dis-similar metals interaction. I’m guessing almost all failures will happen like this.
    I also took some close up images of the cable and the nipple for sizing needs. I’m going to use marine grade coated wire for my new cable and likely make my own nipples. Stay tuned for those details.


    #6569

    Jimmy Newtron
    Participant

    Lastly, I have uploaded hi-def PDF’s of all these images if you want or need more detail:

    Simply copy the address below and paste into a new browser window:
    https://drive.google.com/folderview?id=0B50B5kKOGKQGS2wxbUFEWU5NQnc&usp=sharing

    #6735

    cleeland
    Participant

    Any luck making your own cable?

    #6736

    Jimmy Newtron
    Participant

    Yep. I guess I forgot to upload that part. I used a couple of YouTube videos for guidance (Google “how to solder cable ends”). I used the scrap wood method and did it with everything assembled. Worked like a charm but I suggest you practice on the old cable a couple of times to get the technique and sizing down. The other option is using a universal ferrule (end piece) which most bike shops carry. I couldn’t find the right size but apparently they do exist. Obviously much easier but not sure if they would stand up to the day in day out use on a sliding door. Good luck!

    #6737

    Jimmy Newtron
    Participant

    I should also mention that a lot of motorcycle sites have sections on making your own cables. They suggest 2 alternative methods.:
    1) buy a swagging tool and use it to cold clamp the ferrule end onto the cable. A good swagging tool looms to be about $50
    2) just buy the cable ends and use “liquid steel” or similar epoxy to secure them. Apparently stronger than the cable once set…

    #6738

    cleeland
    Participant

    I had also thought about bike cables. Bike racing is my hobby so I know a lot of people in the bike biz and maybe I’ll be able to find something.

    What kind of cable did you end up using? Did you use coated cable, or just plain stainless stuff?

    I found this video which seems like it does a good job of describing what how to make cable ends.

    I had also thought of using something like PC-7 or JB Weld onto the ends of the cable to make cable ends then grind to shape. I suppose I could try that on some scrap cable.

    Thanks for the followup!

    #6739

    Jimmy Newtron
    Participant

    Apparently Home Depot carries this cable in the US (with a green coating) but here in Canada, I had to buy it on Amazon and have it shipped up. The cable you want is: the Loos Galvanized Steel Wire Rope, Vinyl Coated, 7×7 Strand Core, Black, 1/16″ Bare OD, 3/32″ Coated OD, 25′ Length, 480 lbs Breaking Strength (http://www.amazon.com/dp/B0013HICUY/ref=biss_dp_t_asn)
    It’s an exact match and 25ft will do both doors and then some…

    The cable on my other door is starting to fray and I will be trying the JB Weld instead of the hassle of soldering. I’ll let the group know how it goes.

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