prgonzalez

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Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 200 total)
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  • prgonzalez
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    AC-Delco will work, that is for sure. The question is how long will they last for and how much noise will they induce in your electrical system and radio. One thing I have learned about this engine bay is that it runs very hot and this temperature will damage the ignition wires faster.

    In my van, most of the plastic parts have become brittle because they have been cooked by the high temperature. Recently, I had to replace the main fuse box because it was too brittle and it was cracking. I got a used one from a junk that was still flexible.

    In regards to the cap and rotor, they are not as critical as the wires are. The original brand is Hitachi. But, I have had good results using MasterPro from Oreillys.

    • This reply was modified 2 months, 3 weeks ago by  prgonzalez.

    prgonzalez
    Participant

    Lokahi,

    It’s been a while since I saw you posting here.

    The most common fault for misfire in these vans are ignition wires. To confirm, you can check the total resistance of the spark plug cables including the distributor cover. If the resistance is too high your spark will be weak or inconsistent.

    Check their total resistance with an ohm-meter. From the connector to the internal post in the distributor cover.

    Cyl 1 6.5K ohm max
    Cyl 2 10.0K ohm max
    Cyl 3 8.5K ohm max
    Cyl 4 12.5k ohm max
    Cyl 5 8.5k phm max
    Cyl 6 11.0k ohm max

    If they are over those max values or too close, replace with a new set of wires and a new distributor cap and rotor. One of the original brands used by Nissan are prestolite. When I compared prestolite with other brands, I saw the difference in price is really justified by its quality. And REMEMBER TO REPLACE THE DISTRIBUTOR CAP AND ROTOR too.

    If the resistance is way bellow the limits, you could have an injector problem. Either clogged or bad. I would run injector cleaner anyways, use one that is safe for oxygen sensors like AMSOIL P.I.

    Distributor failure manifest in a total different way, normally it will leave you stranded and it will have the tendency to start correctly when the engine is cold and fail again when the engine warms up. There are two common failures in the distributor, one is ignition coil and the other is the distributor bearing. I would recommend you to plan on replacing the bearing. It only cost less than $10 dollars on Amazon. The replacement is not difficult and it will pay off in the long run avoiding unnecessary headaches. The bearing is a 6000ZZ which can be found for 3.77 in Amazon.

    Pedro

    in reply to: Cabin Lights Short 2000 Quest #15721

    prgonzalez
    Participant

    Reggie,

    I am glad you have two good working headlights now.

    Water in the headlights is caused by either broken glass or bad seal. To replace them, you have to remove the side marker light. Open the hood, there is a Phillips screw holding the side marker. You will see a small light-gray lip coming out of top of the marker. Remove the screw and pry the marker out to the side of the car. Once the markers are removed, you will see two 10-mm head screw that hold the headlight on the side; there is another 10-mm nut holding the headlight on the back; and there is another 10-mm head screw holding the headlight on top. That will remove the headlight. There is no need to remove any parts of the front bumper cover like other cars.

    If the front surface of your headlights are too damaged and not clear at all, you can consider buying new cheap aftermarket headlights. You can find them as low as US$100 each.

    For the black retainers, they are Nissan 26029-7B000. You can find them in eBay or internet, perhaps AZ has them too.

    Many years ago, I bought a new pair of headlights and retrofit them with HID bi-xenon 2.5″ FX-R projectors. The whole retrofit cost me around US$600. I did the installation myself but it requires some skill with the dremel. However, the final result was outstanding modern HID projectors exactly as you see in any infinity today.

    Pedro

    in reply to: Cabin Lights Short 2000 Quest #15691

    prgonzalez
    Participant

    Reggie,

    I was able to see the pictures. The burnt connector explains everything. That is good and this fix will be quick. All you need to do is to cut the damaged connector as close to the connector as you can. Then, peel some of the plastic wire protector in order to expose two to three inches of the three wires. Remove about half-inch of insulation at the tip of each wire. If any copper wire strands look burnt, cut some more until you have clean copper strands in each wire.

    From the new spare connector, remove the mud from the connector and cut the wires about six inches from the connector. You will also be using some of the plastic protector flex tubing to cover these six inches later on. Remove half-inch of insulation in each wire. The copper of each wire should be clean free of any green/white/brown oxidation.

    Get some heat wrap tubing or sleeves at your local Autozone. Select the closest diameter to the wire insulation. The sleeve has to fit loose and not tight to the insulation. Use about 2 inches of heat wrap sleeve for each wire. Insert the sleeves at each wire in the new connector. Place the sleeves at the connector side away from the tip of wire to be spliced. You can also use a bigger diameter heat wrap sleeve to cover all three wires around if you want.

    Now, match color and position of one wire, hardness and connector side. The wires should match in color and strips, red with red, black with black, and yellow with yellow. Please them one in front of the other with about 1/4 inch of copper passing the insulation of the wire in front, twist the wires together until they are secured, and solder the union. Do not apply too much tin. The trick is to prevent sharp or pointing tin spots in the union to prevent pinching the insulating sleeve or heat wrap. Once the wire is soldered, place the heat wrap sleeve in the union so the union is in the middle section of the sleeve. Now apply heat to the sleeve using a heat gun or rubbing the tip of the soldering iron in rapid back and forth movement until the sleeve is tight in the wire. Repeat this process with the other two wires. If you have a larger sleeve, then use it to cover all three unions. This sleeve would be 3 inches long. Finally, protect all exposed wires with the black plastic flex tubing and seal with electrical tape.

    I hope I explained myself correctly in the procedure above.

    Finally, you need to find out why the connector was damaged. Make sure the headlight bulb is the correct power. A larger power bulb will overheat the cable and connector. Make sure there are no short circuits or other wires when connecting the headlight again.

    Let me know how it goes. I will post tester information later.

    Pedro


    prgonzalez
    Participant

    I am so happy you got it working correctly.

    in reply to: Cabin Lights Short 2000 Quest #13241

    prgonzalez
    Participant

    Hoseman,

    Okay, we have multiple challenges on this van. First, has the van been wrecked at one point? If yes, there is a good chance a part of the wire harness was damaged by metal parts crushing the harness. This will explain erratic behavior when the wires move around. Again, if this is the case, the best solution is to replace the harness. Another solution is to identify and replaced all bad wires only. However, this takes more time.

    In regards to the tester, what kind of tester do you have? Is it a multi-meter? Please let me know brand and model and perhaps I can find if on the internet to give you some tips.

    In the mean time, my suggestion is to start isolating the door switches. For this, remove each door switch and verify their state of corrosion, broken studs, electrical wires, etc.

    For your front headlight, visually inspect the connector and look for signs of overheat, high temperature damage, or burnt connector. If this is the case, you will have to replace the connector and few inches of wire.

    Let me know what you find.


    prgonzalez
    Participant

    Hoseman,

    First, I am assuming that you are referring to the front blower. The speed is controlled by the resistor block. This confirms you have a MANUAL A/C control unit, not an automatic. Any difference in ohms of any of the resistors in the new block, compared to the original block, will alter speeds 1 to 3 of the new motor. Speed 4 of the motor is full speed. If the blower does not produce the same speed/flow of air, you are using the wrong fan/motor combination. Please confirm to me if you used original blower fan with new motor or replaced fan/motor combo.

    Looking at the electrical diagram on page HA-148, in position 4 for the front fan, the blower motor is energized with full battery voltage. This means, the resistor block is not used for that speed setting. The block only controls lower speeds from 1 to 3.

    If the motor failed by blowing out the main 20Amp fuses. The original motor is in short-circuit. That might also had blown out the internal fuse of the original resistor block. If this was the case, replace the motor, check the fuse of the resistor block and replace fuse if necessary. Use new motor with original resistor block.

    If the motor failed in open-circuit, use new motor with original resistor block. Check internal fuse of original resistor block and replace if necessary.

    Full procedure for diagnosing the front blower motor starts on page HA-166. With an ohm-meter, please check the resistance of each resistor in the block. Follow the terminal and ohms reference table that is located in manual HA page 171.

    Let me know what results you have.

    • This reply was modified 3 months ago by  prgonzalez.
    • This reply was modified 3 months ago by  prgonzalez.
    • This reply was modified 3 months ago by  prgonzalez.
    in reply to: Cabin Lights Short 2000 Quest #12811

    prgonzalez
    Participant

    Hoseman,

    1. Do you have the service manuals of the van? If not, please download them from http://www.nicoclub.com. Follow the right tab “Service Manuals”

    2. Once you have the PDF manuals, look at the EL (electrical) fle. Go to the INTERIOR ROOM LAMP section. Take the time to understand the schematics or electrical diagrams. All lights are controlled by one SMART ENTRANCE CONTROL UNIT (SECU).

    3. IMHO, your problem could be in the following order: a) one door switch, b) Smart Entrance Control Unit (SECU).

    I have looked at the schematics and I do not see any relation between the steering wheel position and the SECU.

    Please check every door switch from corrosion, check every door is fully closing.

    Let me know hoe it goes. I will be here to assist you.

    Pedro

    • This reply was modified 3 months, 1 week ago by  prgonzalez.
    in reply to: gas fumes in cabin! #12781

    prgonzalez
    Participant

    Check fuel regulator and O-Ring in fuel regulator.

    Also, check possible leaks in fuel injector seals.


    prgonzalez
    Participant

    Well…this forum has been available for some years now. It does not have the popularity of other web sites, or maybe there are not enough DIY people owning these vans anymore. There are few active members that still want to see these vans on the streets. Between them and myself, we can help you out with your quest.

    Pedro

    in reply to: Cracked exhaust manifold or broken manifold studs? #12731

    prgonzalez
    Participant

    Yanni,

    I will be glad to be able to help you with your new van. Feel free to open up new threads for specific issues.

    Pedro

    in reply to: 95 quest diy restoration #12721

    prgonzalez
    Participant

    Yanni,

    The service manuals can be found at http://www.nicoclub.com, follow the tab at the right hand side “Service Manuals”. They are FREE.

    For parts, the remaining original parts are now held back in a Nissan’s central warehouse. Any part you order from a local Nissan dealer will take some days delay to order the part from the central warehouse. Other good web site is http://www.partsgeek.com, they offer a variety of 3rd party and close to original manufacturer quality. Your other option is always your local junk yards.

    For now, let’s start with the basics:

    1. Check break pads remaining material, rotors and drums from polished or damage surfaces.
    2. Measure all cylinder compression values.
    3. Inspect transmission and steering fluids. Change out transmission fluid is recommended. Flush steering fluid is recommended.
    4. Inspect break fuild, flush old fluid is recommended if has not been done in two years.
    5. Inspect coolant and radiator from possible leaks
    6. Inspect timing belt or obtain date of last change.
    7. Inspect axle boots from cracks.
    8. Inspect possible fluid leaks underneath the vehicle.
    9. If engine is durty or grease, clean the whole engine with engine degreaser and water. This will help you identify all existing leaks that need repair.
    10. Replace spark plugs if they have not been replaced at 200K miles mark. Use double platinum laser, brand and model as recommended by Nissan.
    11. Inspect A/C hoses, compressor, unions from possible leaks.
    12. Verify ECM for any pending or existing error codes.

    Pedro

    • This reply was modified 3 months, 3 weeks ago by  prgonzalez.
    in reply to: Cracked exhaust manifold or broken manifold studs? #12681

    prgonzalez
    Participant

    I finally replaced the rear manifold. The leak was at the thermal expansion joint of the manifold. Because the two manifolds are fixed to the engine, the pieces will expand and contract with hot and cold temperatures, specially when the engine is operating. The thermal expansion joint is in place to avoid cracking or breaking of any pieces, flanges, studs, etc.

    I am not sure how to include pictures in this post. If you are interested, send me a message and I will be happy to send you the pictures.

    The van is now 238,532 miles and rolling.

    Pedro

    • This reply was modified 4 months ago by  prgonzalez.
    in reply to: Cracked exhaust manifold or broken manifold studs? #12561

    prgonzalez
    Participant

    I was able to get the rear manifold at a local junk yard from a van with 166K miles. The removal of the rear manifold takes about two hours. It is necessary to remove all of the heat shields of the front manifold to remove the front union nuts. The rear nuts can be removed after removing the heat shield from underneath the van. This take some time. I was lucky the power steering pump was already removed from the junked van. One advice is to only use six (6) point deep sockets for all those nuts and use the longest breaker bar you can get it fit in the small space. After removing the nuts, you have to remove the studs using a E-Torkx socket. The studs are easy to remove. From the top, it is necessary to remove the EGR, air filter box, and battery base to get the necessary space to take the manifold out.

    in reply to: Timing Belt Change #12541

    prgonzalez
    Participant

    I am glad you got it working with the proper belt position.

    The coolant system takes some time to get the air out. One technique is to fill in with the front of the van on a jack to have the radiator cap as the highest point.

    Also, run the A/C heater at maximum temp to have hot coolant recirculation inside the heater core and hoses. Keep the coolant reservoir filled with coolant and watch its level for the first hot/cold cycles. The system will burp the air and suck in the coolant. If the coolant is not being sucked correctly leaving low level of coolant in the radiator after a cycle of operation, replace the radiator cap.

    One important observation, DO NOT USE WATER ONLY in the coolant system. Always use 50/50 coolant as a minimum to prevent internal corrosion. If you purchase concentrated coolant, mix it 50/50 with distilled water. DO NOT USE TAP WATER.

    • This reply was modified 4 months, 3 weeks ago by  prgonzalez.
Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 200 total)